Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh begins making his case to senators

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"In nominating Brett Kavanaugh, Donald Trump has followed through on his threat to nominate a justice who would undermine LGBTQ equality, women's reproductive rights and affordable healthcare", said HRC President Chad Griffin.

LevinTV host Mark Levin started his radio show Tuesday evening discussing Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump's nominee to become the next Supreme Court justice.

Democrats also focused on a law review article Kavanaugh wrote in 2009 that said a president should not face criminal investigation while in office, and instead be impeached for wrongdoing.

"We'll try to do what we can to accommodate everybody's interest", he said.

"I look forward to meeting with Judge Kavanaugh and to the Senate's fair consideration of his nomination, beginning with the work of Chairman Grassley and the Judiciary Committee". The Supreme Court decision not to do so led to Bush becoming the president. But conservatives are also concerned about the future of the law under Kavanaugh.

It also didn't hurt that Kavanaugh emerged from his years in the White House with an expansive view on executive power and a belief that presidents should not be distracted by lawsuits or investigations while in office. While refusing to answer whether he believed Roe was correctly decided during his confirmation hearing for the DC Circuit, once on the bench he wrote that his colleagues had "badly erred" by determining that an undocumented immigrant teen should have access to an abortion.

McConnell said Kavanaugh was an "outstanding nomination".

He said Kavanaugh is considered "a brilliant judicial mind" and his selection was the result of a process set by "the most transparent president in history".

For its part, the NAACP vowed to fight Kavanaugh's nomination, saying the confirmation process should be postponed until after the election of a new Senate in November's mid-term elections. "A more conservative majority could be more willing to uphold state restrictions on abortion, if not overturn the 45-year-old landmark Roe v. Wade decision that established a woman's constitutional right". One of their hopes is to win governor's mansions this fall (see my in-need-of-an-update Top 10 governor's races here), and then be in a position to veto maps drawn by still-Republican-controlled legislatures, and then at least force those maps to go to courts, which have ruled in favor of Democrats lately.

A product of the Republican legal establishment in Washington, Kavanaugh is a former law clerk for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Kavanaugh is a "superb" Supreme Court pick and that senators should "put partisanship aside" in considering him.

Vanita Gupta, president and CEO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, an umbrella coalition of more than 200 civil rights organisations in the U.S., likened Kavanaugh to Trump, a property tycoon, saying "he would protect the rights of the wealthy and powerful over the rights of all". Activists for the group prepared multiple versions of protest signs for a rally Monday night on the steps of the high court, not knowing whom Trump would ultimately pick. Sens. Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota have all been floated as possible "yes" votes for Kavanaugh, but on Tuesday, they were just as mum as their moderate colleagues on the other side of the aisle.

The US president said Judge Kavanaugh was known for having a "proven commitment to equal justice under the law".

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